favorite quotes

“I define connection as the energy that exists between people when they feel seen, heard, and valued; when they can give and receive without judgement; and when they derive sustenance and strength from the relationship.”  ~Brené Brown from The Gifts of Imperfection

“Caring passionately about something isn’t against nature, and it isn’t against human nature. It’s what we’re here to do” Annie Dillard

“Women catch courage from the women whose lives and writings they read,
and women call the bearer of that courage, friend.”

– Carolyn Heilbrun, The Last Gift of Time: Life beyond Sixty

For things to happen …you must write
– G. Lynn Nelson

You do not become good by trying to be good but by finding the goodness already within and allowing it to emerge; which can only happen if a fundamental shift occurs in your state of consciousness.
Eckhart Tolle, A New Earth: Awakening to your Life’s Purpose

 

“It’s not what you produce as you write that matters.
It’s who you become as you write that matters.
Louise deSalvo, Writing as a Way of Healing

 

Nature invites us to discover connection. This is the same invitation of poem-making: . . . these connections become catalysts for insight. . . As we write, these interwoven elements help us to discover more . . . about how our life is ultimately connected to everything around us. Sound, imagery, rhythm, metaphor, personification are all ways to express natural connections. –  John Fox, Poetic Medicine

Recent Posts

in which i learn the difference between ‘blur’ and ‘out of focus’

me with granddaughter alice, by jim hester

It is an undeniably sweet picture.  When I first saw it on my husband’s camera, I felt a small twinge that (it seems) manifested as a sigh, or catch of my breath; something easily (and apparently) interpreted as disappointment. 

In fact, it was surprise. I had not anticipated the image being so … out of focus. My husband is a masterful photographer, winner of awards and seller of his prints at art shows. He prides himself on his artistry, whether the subject be landscape, tight leaf shot or portrait. So I had some context for my initial, um, surprise.

This was a parting shot of myself with my newest grand-child, Alice. She and her family had spent the Thanksgiving holiday with us and our hosting daughter. At the time of this photo, her family was saying its goodbyes in preparation for their return drive to points south. A precious moment, captured.

When I expressed my surprise at the unfocused nature of this shot – especially in comparison with the quite clear pictures taken before and after – my husband patiently explained to me the intentional artistry involved in creating a ‘blurred’ shot in which the camera moves slowly to create a soft brush-stroke effect. If it were simply out of focus, he said, edges would be unclear and the whole would be unidentifiable.

As always, I am grateful for his artistic eye and for the intention with which he creates his chosen art form. It IS a beautifully watercolor-like image and one I shall cherish. In fact, the longer I look at it, the more it invokes two of my favorite mother-child artists: Mary Cassatt and Pablo Picasso … Yes, my husband is a figure artist with his lens.  And he has captured, in this BLURRED still life, the essence of a weekend filled with love and loving moments, each one crystal clear; though, in toto, they collage into something of a blur.

 

 

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